In Progress Scifi Video Warhammer 40K

Archaeopter Part 1: Cockpit Painting And Assembly

If you know Warhammer 40K, as soon as you see the Archaeopter the thought “Adeptus Mechanicus” immediately comes to mind. They’re definitely weird designs, but it’s weird in a wonderful, cool way. It’s almost as if there is a recipe for the designs. Start with a hint of the familiar. Throw in a cup of steampunk. And add in sprinkling of fancifully odd. Finish off with by grating some bizzare over it, and you have your Mechanicus design.

The Archaeopter is no exception. It starts with what basically looks like an old Soviet helicopter design. To that is added some bolts and gears and grab handles. The rotor blades are tossed aside, to be replaced by giant mechanical bat wings. The landing gear are substituted with grasshopper feet, and you end up with the Archaeopter.

Examining The Archaeopter Kit

As with all of the Citadel Warhammer kits I’ve built, the parts are nicely molded, with very sharp, exaggerated detail. Overall fit is good. There is a seam line down the middle of the fuselage that will need some attention. Assembly is quite easy, as there really aren’t a large number of parts.

As the kit features a fairly nicely little cockpit assembly, I started the painting by getting that sorted out first. The instructions have some nice photos to give painting suggestions, but as with all things Warhammer, you can certainly paint it up as you want.

Once the cockpit is place and the fuselage halves are glued together, you’ll want to use a little bit of filler to close the seams up. Once that is complete, it’s ready for priming!

While the kit is designed to be used as a game piece in the Warhammer 40K tabletop game, I’d recommend this kit to anyone. It definitely falls into the “unique” side of scifi, and though it is a bit pricey, the cost to fun ratio is very good on it.

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5 comments

  1. Hi Jon,
    Sadly I don’t yet feel the slightest draw to this genre, it’s too far beyond targets, I mean AFVs for me.
    However,cross pollination of build techniques and paint weathering ideas are always useful. Like that Archaeopter would have a canopy over the cockpit? Unless the advanced technology has force field shielding that allows, no don’t go there. Looking ahead to its canopy, how do you glue the canopy to that painted edge surface?
    Currently building the aircraft involved in the Battle of 🇬🇧 Britainand hence no yet looked thru all you articles for that nugget.
    Cheers from New Zealand except I’m a Limey,
    Alastair

    1. Yep – there’s always some technique or method that can be picked up from any genre isn’t there?

      It does have a canopy. In the video it featured briefly as a mask during priming. Once painted, I’ll attach it as I normally do for canopies – Tamiya Extra Thin Cement! 😀

      Thanks for visiting the site!

  2. Darn you Jon, that kit looks so cool and fun to build that I bought one too! Doing some looking around on the Games Workshop site I also bought the “Aeronautica Imperialis: Wings of Vengeance” set because it has 9 kits that also look fun, (and I’ll probably try out the game too). I say darn you because you are also the reason I built a few Gunpla kits. Those were fun too. I don’t think I’ll continue in the genre but the things that I learned were valuable.

    I think these 40K kits will be a great platform to learn and practice some new skills while I keep myself busy. I’m looking forward to watching your progress on this kit and wonder how I will make mine.

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