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Trumpeter’s 1/48 Mig-3: Mr. Coffee To The Rescue!

The decals are on the Mig-3. And I can say I really, really, like the fact that there weren’t very many at all. Decals are probably my least favorite part of a build.

The Trumpeter decals are very good. Quite thin, apply nicely, settle down reasonably well, and when Solvaset is applied, they conform very admirably.

The colors might be a bit suspicious, in some kits. But on this one… well, it’s red and white. Pretty basic. (And the little yellow decals… forgot those.)

Before adding the decals, I gave the airframe a good coat of Future. In fact, I did two coats. Better safe than sorry.

Mr. Coffee’s mug warmer keeps your decal water warm. And it works on coffee, too!

And here’s a handy tip I learned a few years ago- decals work better (generally) in warm water. But keeping the water warm can be an issue. So I purchased a Mr. Coffee Cup Warmer, and that solved my problem. (Well, specifically, the decal water warming problem… I still have many, many other problems, Mahoney. 🙂 )

I just heat my water up in the microwave, place it on the warmer, and away it goes. The warmer is good at keeping something warm- not so great at heating it up, unless you give it plenty of time. 

Once the decals were applied and Solvasetted, and given a bit of drying time, I traced a #11 blade through any panel lines that the decals were over, and applied more Solvaset. This really helps give a good, sharp line.

Once that was set, I airbrushed on a bit more Future over the decals, and once dry, went on to the panel line wash.

For the panel line wash, I used Ammo of Mig’s Deep Brown (A.MIG-1618), which I find to be a very good color for most World War II aircraft. I applied it in fairly sloppy fashion over the panel lines, gave it half an hour to ruminate on the subject, and then wiped off the excess with a piece of dry paper towel. I’ll be going back later and applying some post shading on the upper side, just to help that stand out a bit more.

There are still quite a few weathering steps ahead, but I’m pleased with how this one is turning out.

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